Archaeological Park Tasumal
El Salvador, Santa Ana

The Tasumal Archaeological Park is located in the west of Salvador, in the department of Santa Ana, in the city of Chalchuapa. Tasumal - the ruins of the largest city of Mayan civilization in El Salvador, translated from the Quiche language, which is part of the Mayan language group, means "the place of burning of the victims." The ruins date from 100-1200 years of our era, include pyramids, temples, ritual objects, tombs, a ball stadium and a complex system of gutters. The city was built, in total, for 750 years, for many years the work was interrupted due to the eruption of the Ilopango volcano. The heyday of Tasumal belongs to the classical period (250-900 years of our era), the best-preserved buildings date back to 600-900 years of our era (post-classical period). The central and largest construction of the city is a 24-meter high ceremonial platform platform. Around the platform, once there were small temples, in its northern part 23 tombs with 400 clay vessels were discovered in which jade and pearl jewelry were found - earrings, necklaces, rings, pyrite mirrors, as well as religious objects. In the north of the city there is a field for playing ball, in the west - a pyramid built in the Toltec style. Found in 1892 on the territory of the ruins, the sculpture Awakening Tasumal or Virgin Tasumal, 2.65 meters high and 1.16 meters wide, was deposited at the National Museum of Anthropology in San Salvador. In 1200, the city was abandoned by residents for an unknown reason. All research data speaks about the wealth and prosperity of citizens, and objects found on the ruins of Tasumal indicate well-developed trade relations with cities located on the territory of modern Mexico and Panama. Archaeological excavations in Tasumal in the years 1940-1950 were conducted under the direction of the American archaeologist Stanley Boggs, during the work it was established that the area of the ancient city was about 10 square kilometers. Unfortunately, most of Tasumal is hidden under the buildings of the modern city. In areas where it is possible to carry out excavations, archaeological research is carried out in our days, and until now, priceless artifacts are found here. In 1952, the Stanley Boggs small museum was opened in the Archaeological Park, which shows the finds found on the territory of Tasumal, among the exhibits - an clay statue of Ksipe-Totek, a bloodthirsty demon who sent troubles and deprivations to Maya. To appease the evil deity, they brought sacrifices and erected statues.

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