Ethnographic Museum in Budapest
Hungary, Budapest

The Ethnographic Museum in Budapest is one of the largest, most important museums in Europe, whose diverse collections contain more than 200 thousand ethnographic artifacts, as well as historical photographs, manuscripts, folk music, films and videos, both of Hungarian and international cultural significance. It is noteworthy that the Hungarian collection of the museum contains the largest material on traditional Hungarian folk culture, not only in Hungary, but throughout Europe. The collection of religious objects represents various articles, images, figurines that belonged to churches or religious communities. These are furniture from Greek Orthodox, Greek Catholic (Uniate), Roman Catholic and Reformed churches, copies of chapels, sculptures, badges and roadside crosses. The earliest instance of this collection is the painted panel from the ceiling of the church in Adamos, dated 1526. Of particular interest are painted decorative elements from the interiors of the 18th century Reformed churches, as well as Greek-Orthodox and Greek-Catholic icons and iconostases. A significant part of the collection consists of glass paintings produced in the workshops of the monasteries of Central and Eastern Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries. There are also 11,000 exhibits (religious statues, icons, prayer beads, vows and offerings) from the 18th to 20th centuries. The museum has a huge collection of smuggled goods confiscated by the customs authorities of the country. It includes two large groups of artifacts: children's toys (more than 2700 pieces) and objects associated with various folk customs (more than 20,000 pieces), the last of which includes a special collection of painted Easter eggs (more than 3300 pieces). Numerous exhibits in the museum feature a collection of musical instruments compiled by Count Zichy Jenő and János Xántus, in Russia, East Asia and Southeast Asia between 1869 and 1870. Most of the instruments in the folk music collection come from the Carpathian basin and, thus, are Hungarian and neighboring ethnic groups. In addition to instruments, the museum’s music collection includes such unique exhibits as phonographs, a collection of phonograph records, a collection of tape recordings, a collection of music videos, and so on. The European collection covers all ethnic groups on the continent. In addition, the museum features an ethnographic collection of Oceania and Africa, collected by famous Hungarian world travelers and ethnographers of Hungary, who shared their collections of genuine artifacts from America, Asia and Indonesia. For example, the African Ethnographic Collection has about 10,000 exhibits representing the entire African continent and the island of Madagascar. More than half of the collection was collected between 1874 and the end of World War I. Since 1973, the Ethnographic Museum has been housed in the building of the former Palace of Justice. The project in the style of the Grunding era was prepared by the architect Alaios Housman. The impressive museum building is located across from the Hungarian Parliament, on Kossutha ter. Its chic atmosphere and easy accessibility make it not only a prominent center of Hungarian cultural life, but also a convenient meeting place for tourists.

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Central Market in Budapest
Aquincum Museum
Aquincum Museum
Royal Palace in Budapest
Royal Palace in Budapest
Hungarian State Opera House
Hungarian State Opera House