Dublin Botanical Garden
Ireland, Dublin (city)

The Botanical Garden was founded in Dublin in 1795, and since 1838 it has become known far beyond the borders of Ireland. Dublin’s Green Heart, locals lovingly call it, occupies 25 hectares in the heart of the Irish capital. The garden map of 1800 has been preserved. The layout shown on it is largely consistent with today's. The main territory of the garden stretches south of the bank of the Tolka River, and part is located on the island. The initial goal of opening the Botanical Garden was to study and develop agricultural practices. In the early years, plants were grown in it, useful for humans, animals and medicine. Over time, plants began to breed here that contributed to the study and systematization of botanical knowledge, as well as simply beautiful and interesting specimens. Now in the collection of the garden there are more than 300 endangered plant species and 6 species that have completely disappeared from the wild. Throughout its existence, a unique plant fund has been carefully created in the botanical garden, and now it has about twenty thousand plants. On the territory there are several greenhouses for tropical plants and for plants that are not adapted to the climate of Ireland. These are plants such as coffee, tea, avocados, olives, pomegranates and others. For urban residents, especially for children, it is very interesting to get acquainted with one of the areas of the botanical garden where fruits and vegetables are common throughout Europe: tomatoes, cucumbers, pumpkins, grapes and much more. Over the past two hundred and odd years from the day of its foundation, thematic sections have appeared in the garden, interconnected by picturesque ponds and canals, multi-tiered alpine hills and bright multi-colored flower beds. The Palm House deserves special attention, where the representatives of this plant family from all over the world delight visitors. Throughout the garden grass paths are laid between groups of trees that are planted according to a systematic principle (grouped by genus). Here you can see wonderful collections of alder, birch, hawthorn, hornbeam, maples, oaks, beech and other plants. Since 1992, a large-scale program of restoration and renewal of the plant base of the Botanical Garden has been launched. New greenhouses, a specialized library were restored and opened, and in 1999 an information center for visitors was opened, offering tourists audio tours, free guided walks and a film dedicated to the National Botanical Garden. Entrance to the Botanical Garden is free, so residents and guests of Dublin regard it as a public park. This is a great place for walking and relaxing.

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