Oslo Viking Ship Museum
Norway, Oslo

In the Oslo Viking Ship Museum in Oslo, three old Viking ships are represented: Oserberg, Gokstad and Thune, as well as objects found in them. The Oserberg ship was discovered on August 8, 1903 by Professor Gabriel Gustafson during archaeological excavations of the mound near the town of Oserberg. After completion of the excavation, restoration and restoration of the ship took 21 years. The ship was built in 820, in 834 it was used for the burial of two women of noble family. It was made of oak wood, accommodated 30 rowers, the pine mast reached a height of 13 meters. The keel is decorated with a carved ornament and a skillfully carved figure of an animal, which may indicate that the ship belongs to a noble family. During the burial on the ship of women, a tomb was built on the deck, the inner walls of which were decorated with tapestries. According to custom, animals accompanied the skeletal world of the deceased (skeletons of six dogs, fifteen horses and two cows were found in the mound), clothes, textiles, dishes, a sleigh, a cart, jewelry and rich gifts from relatives. The Gokstad ship was discovered by two teenagers in 1879 in the Tsar’s Barrow, located next to the Gokstad farm. In 1880, archaeological excavations were begun, as a result of which the Viking ship, built in 885 - 892 years of our era, was discovered. The ship could accommodate a crew of 34 people, on each side there are 16 holes for oars. The ship is made of oak wood, the deck and the mast are made of pine. Thanks to laboratory studies, it was found that in 900 the ship was used to bury a noble man who died in battle. At the rear of the ship was built a tomb, covered with several layers of bark. Archaeologists have found traces of silk fabrics with gold threads, the remains of expensive carpets. 64 shields, fishing equipment made of lead, iron and gilt bronze, a tent, a sled, three small boats, skeletons of 12 horses, 8 dogs, two hawks and two peacocks were found in the tomb. Ornaments and rich weapons were stolen from their mound, most likely, back in the time of the Vikings. The Tuna ship was found in 1867 in a mound near the Lower Haugen farm. The ship was built in 900, could accommodate a crew of 24 people and was intended for the transport of goods and goods. Due to the quick and careless excavations of the ship, it was significantly damaged, many items on the ship did not reach the museum. According to the remaining items in the tomb, scientists concluded that a noble man was buried on the ship. In 1913, Professor Gabriel Gustafson proposed the creation of a museum for the three discovered ships. It was built by the famous Norwegian architect Arnberg. In 1926, the hall was ready to accommodate the Oseberg ship, in 1932 - the halls for the Gokstad and Tuna ships. The museum was completely completed in 1957. Currently, work is underway on the construction of a new building for the Viking Ship Museum, the new complex will be three times larger than the existing museum.

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