Great Buddha Hall
Japan, Nara

Daibutsuden, or the Great Buddha Hall, in the Todaiji monastery, is the largest wooden building in the world, although today it is only two-thirds of its original size. The construction of the Todaiji Temple dates back to the middle of the VIII century, when Buddhism, which had penetrated Japan two centuries earlier, had already become the state religion and had a significant impact on the art and architecture of this country. The fate of Daybutsuden was by no means cloudless. It burned many times and was restored many times. Today it occupies an area of 58 X 51 meters, and in height is 49 meters. The hall was built in the VIII century by order of the emperor Shomu, and it houses one of the largest bronze statues in the world. The Great Buddha is one of Japan's most famous landmarks, and it is also the largest Buddha figure in the whole country. It was designed by a Korean sculptor, known in Japan under the name Kimimaro. Buddha was cast from 444 tons of bronze. The seated figure is 16 meters high. The face is 4.9 meters long, 3 meters wide, and giant ears - 2.4 meters. Buddha's right hand is stretched forward with open palm. This is a gesture of blessing, and the one to whom he is addressed receives peace of mind. The position of the left hand symbolizes the fulfillment of desires. Buddha sits on the foundation in the form of a terrace, which is formed by 56 bronze lotus petals. Behind the head of the Buddha is a wooden gilded halo, which depicts 16 of his incarnations. This addition dates back to the 17th century, as do the two statues that represent the merciful goddess Cannon and the deity of Happiness. To the right of the Buddha is a wooden pillar with a small hole through which all the pilgrims are trying to climb: according to the old legend, if successful, they will be provided with paradise. In the hall there are other figures of the heavenly guards, as well as a model of the hall itself in its original form.
The building was consecrated in 752 at an extremely magnificent ceremony in the presence of the emperor and empress, the entire court, clergy and delegations from all over Japan, China and Korea. Some of the then used robes, sacred vessels, jewelry and other jewelry are now stored in the most probably the oldest museum in the world, in the temple treasury. This museum is sometimes open to the public. The museum also has natural air conditioning. It is designed so skillfully that in wet weather the wooden beams expand, and due to this, outside is a new temple of the Buddhist sect Kegon, which was very common in Japan in the VIII century. The walled temple can be entered through a large gate with a two-story roof, which was rebuilt in 1199 and is supported by 18 wooden poles 21 meters high. Two eight-meter-long eerie-looking statues are not at the gate. Other historically important temples and shrines are located in the park adjacent to Nara, which clearly expresses the spirit and taste of the Japanese. Many ancient objects are stored in the temple treasury: ancient Buddhist and traditional Japanese robes, sacred vessels, jewelry, jewelry, objects of traditional Japanese art from paper and silk.

Related Tour Objects
St. George Monastery
St. George Monastery
Abbeys and Monasteries
Meteora Monasteries
Meteora Monasteries
Abbeys and Monasteries
Thiangboche Monastery
Thiangboche Monastery
Abbeys and Monasteries
Annunciation monastery
Annunciation monastery
Abbeys and Monasteries
Monastery of the Old Believers in Voinovo
Monastery of the Old Believers in Voinovo
Abbeys and Monasteries